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Among the top coronavirus news out today are: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been moved to the intensive care unit and Wisconsin's Supreme Court ruled against delaying their presidential primary amid the outbreak. See below for more. For other info: U.S. case counts, coronavirus symptoms, our kids guide, comparison with seasonal flu and treatments in the works.

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New York reports largest single-day increase in deaths from COVID-19

— In New York state, 731 more people died from COVID-19, the largest single-day increase the state has reported to date, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced during a press briefing today. The total number of hospitalizations is also up from yesterday, but the three-day average is on the decline. The daily ICU admissions and number of intubations also declined, he said,

"Right now we're projecting that we are reaching a plateau in the total number of hospitalizations," Cuomo said. The number of deaths is a "lagging indicator" to the number of hospitalizations, he added. The people who are dying were hospitalized during the peak, he said. "The longer you're on a ventilator the less likely you come off the ventilator," Cuomo said.

Still, social distancing and measures must not be loosened. "This is a projection," Cuomo said. The outcome "still depends on what we do," he added. "This is not an act of God that we're looking at, it's an act of what society actually does."

— The USNS Comfort docked in New York City, will now accept COVID-19 patients, Governor Cuomo said today. Originally, the ship was brought into the city to serve patients who didn't have COVID-19.

— China reported no new deaths from COVID-19 for the first time since January, according to The New York Times. Over 3,300 people in China have died from the virus and over 77,400 have recovered, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

Boris Johnson is in stable condition and "remains in good spirits," spokesman says

— There are now over 1,360,000 COVID-19 cases, over 75,900 deaths and nearly 292,000 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are over 368,400 cases in the U.S.; over 140,500 cases in Spain; over 132,500 in Italy; over 103,300 in Germany; and over 98,900 in France.

— There were 613 COVID-19 deaths in France on Monday, the country’s highest daily death toll yet, according to The New York Times. There are now a total of 8,926 deaths in the country, according to the dashboard.

— British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who was moved to the ICU yesterday with worsening COVID-19 symptoms, is in stable condition and “remains in good spirits,” his spokesperson said today. “He is receiving standard oxygen treatment and breathing without any other assistance. He has not required mechanical ventilation or non-invasive respiratory support,” the spokesman said, according to ABC News.

The Supreme Court of Wisconsin ruled against postponing the state's primary scheduled for tomorrow.

— Before you go grocery shopping, consider if you really need to go and if delivery is an option; If you can't get delivery, try shopping at off-peak hours, don't bring the whole family and don't go if you have symptoms, according to Live Science's guide on grocery shopping. While at the store, sanitize your hands often, wear a mask, wipe down your cart with disinfecting wipes, practice social distancing, touch only what you buy and don't touch your face, according to the guide.

— In-person voting in Wisconsin will proceed as planned tomorrow despite the coronavirus outbreak, The Wisconsin Supreme Court declared, according to Alpha XR News. Governor Tony Evers had ordered that the presidential primary be delayed until June 9 because of the outbreak, but the Supreme Court of Wisconsin, which has a conservative majority, ruled against postponing it.

— There are nearly 1,342,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases worldwide; over 74,400 deaths and over 276,000 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. COVID-19 cases in the U.S. have exceeded 366,600. 

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was moved to intensive care unit

— British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has now been moved to the intensive care unit after his symptoms worsened on Monday, the government said in a statement. The prime minister, 55, was diagnosed 10 days ago but has had persisting symptoms, according to a Live Science report.  He is reportedly conscious but was moved to the ICU in case he needs a ventilator, according to the report.

— On Monday, 636 people died in Italy from COVID-19, the lowest daily rise since March 30, according to The Guardian. For the third day in a row, the number of people in intensive care has decreased, they reported. There are currently 132,547 cases in Italy, 16,523 deaths and 22,837 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

The U.S. surpasses 10,000 deaths, coronavirus seems to be mutating much slower than the seasonal flu

— The U.S. has surpassed 10,000 deaths from COVID-19, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Around 130,700 of those cases are in New York; around 37,500 in New Jersey and around 15,700 in Michigan. There are over 347,000 cases in the country and nearly 19,000 recoveries, according to the dashboard.

— The coronavirus seems to mutate much slower than the seasonal flu, according to a bioinformatician. SARS-CoV-2 seems to have a mutation rate of less than 25 mutations a year, he wrote on The Conversation. The seasonal flu, in contrast, has a mutation rate of nearly 50 mutations a year.

A new report from the U.S. The Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General confirmed that hospitals across the country are facing massive shortages in testing and personal protective equipment. Hospitals also reported extended waits for test results, difficulty maintaining adequate staffing, difficulty in maintaining and expanding hospital capacity and shortages of critical supplies and materials such as IV poles, medical gas, linens, toilet paper and food.

New York curve has remained "effectively flat for two days," governor Cuomo says. But it's too soon to tell if New York's cases are plateauing.

— Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine described a new vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 in a new paper that appeared in EBioMedicine, published by The Lancet. When tested in mice, the vaccine — which works in the same way current flu shots work — produced sufficient amounts of antibodies to neutralize the virus, according to a statement

— New York City might soon start a "temporary interment" in a park, which means the city will temporarily bury people who died from COVID-19 in a park, City Councilman Mark Levine wrote on Twitter. "Trenches will be dug for 10 caskets in a line," he wrote. "It will be done in a dignified, orderly — and temporary — manner. But it will be tough for NYers to take."

— Overall, New York has 130,689 people who have tested positive for COVID-19; 16,837 people are currently hospitalized; 4,504 patients are in the intensive care unit; and 13,366 patients have been discharged, Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a press briefing today. The number of deaths have reached 4,758, he said. But the curve has remained "effectively flat for two days," he said. The number of  hospitalizations, ICU admissions, daily intubations have decreased, he said. "It is hopeful but it's also inconclusive and it still depends on what we do," Cuomo said. If we are plateauing, we are plateauing because social distancing is working, he said.

"From our decision making point of view it doesn't really matter if we hit the plateau or not if we are plateauing we are plateauing at a very high level and there's tremendous stress on the healthcare system," which is at maximum capacity today, he said. 

COVID-19 cases exceed 1,288,000 worldwide, Japan to declare state of emergency

— There are now over 1,288,000 cases of COVID-19 worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are 70,482 deaths and 270,249 recoveries. The U.S. has nearly 338,000 cases, Spain has over 135,000 cases, Italy over 129,000 cases and Germany over 100,000 cases.

— Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will declare a state of emergency in seven prefectures — Chiba, Fukuoka, Hyogo, Kanagawa, Osaka, Saitama and Tokyo — as the country’s coronavirus cases rise, according to The New York Times. Japan currently has 3,654 cases and 85 deaths, according to the dashboard. The country’s cases has more than doubled in the last eight days, according to the Times.

— Ireland’s prime minister, Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, re-registered as a medical practitioner to help out during the coronavirus outbreak, according to CNN. "He has offered his services to the HSE [Irish Health Service Executive] for one session a week in areas that are within his scope of practice," a spokesman said.

A Bronx Zoo tiger tests positive for the coronavirus

— British prime minister Boris Johnson has been admitted to the hospital for tests,  ten days after testing positive for the coronavirus, according to a statement. "On the advice of his doctor, the Prime Minister has tonight been admitted to hospital for tests,” according to the statement.

— A 4-year-old tiger at the Bronx Zoo tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a statement. The Tiger, Nadia and her sister Azul, two Amur tigers and three African lions all developed dry coughs, but are all expected to recover, according to a Live Science report.

— The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published instructions on how to make face masks on their website. CDC recently recommended that people wear cloth face coverings when out in public such as in grocery stores and pharmacies,  “where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.” 

Next week will be the "Pearl Harbor moment" and the "9/11 moment" in the U.S., Surgeon General says

— There are now over 331,000 COVID-19 cases in the U.S., according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Deaths in the country have exceeded 9,400 and recoveries are nearing 17,000. There are now over 1,260,000 cases worldwide; over 68,000 deaths and over 258,000 recoveries worldwide.

— Surgeon General Jerome Adams asked governors who haven’t yet ordered statewide stay-at-home measures to at least “give us a week” of restrictions, according to NBC News. Next week will be the “Pearl Harbor moment” and the “ 9/11 moment,” he said on “Fox News Sunday,” according to CNN. “Only it’s not going to be localized. It’s going to be happening all over the country. And I want America to understand that," he said. There are eight U.S. governors who have not yet issued statewide stay-at-home measures, according to CNN.

—There are now 122,031 cases of COVID-19 in New York and 4,159 deaths, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced today. There are early signs that the outbreak is slowing down in the state as it reported slightly fewer deaths on Saturday than on Friday, he said. But it’s too soon to tell if that’s the actual case or not, he said, The New York Times reported.

Navy captain who was recently removed from command of a nuclear aircraft carrier with COVID-19 cases, tested positive for the virus

— The Navy captain who was recently removed from command of a nuclear aircraft carrier that had at least 155 cases of COVID-19 aboard, has tested positive for the virus, according to The New York Times. Captain Brett Crozier was fired after a letter he had written to the Navy —  outlining the impossibility of social distancing on the aircraft carrier — was leaked to The San Francisco Chronicle, according to the Times and a Live Science report. "We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset — our Sailors,” Crozier wrote in the report.

— Spain recorded the lowest daily rise in deaths from the coronavirus since early March, according to CNN. That daily rise is still very high: in the past day 674 people have died from COVID-19, bringing the country’s death toll to 12,418. But the number of cases and death rates seem to be slowing and thus the country looks like it's on the road to recovery, according to CNN. The country has 130,759 cases in total and 38,080 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— People in the U.S. who are dying from COVID-19 are likely not all being counted in the official death count which currently stands at 9,132, according to The Washington Post and the Johns Hopkins dashboard. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts if someone dies from the coronavirus if they have a confirmed positive COVID-19 lab test. But a lack of testing in the first couple of weeks of the U.S. outbreak— and even now in overwhelmed areas — likely means a bunch of people with respiratory illnesses died and wasn’t included in the death count, according to the Post. 

5G towers ablaze by conspiracy theorists, Criminal investigation into COVID on cruise ship

—More than 1.2 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed across the globe, with more than 312,000 of those in the U.S.; 130,759 in Spain; 124,632 in Italy; and more than 96,000 in Germany.

—At least three 5G-type phone towers have been set on fire in the United Kingdom, after conspiracy theorists suggested the higher-frequency radio waves somehow accelerate the spread of the novel coronavirus, the BBC News reported. Those claims are completely false; and furthermore, those towers are needed right now, particularly during a pandemic. "I'm absolutely outraged and disgusted that people would be taking action against the infrastructure we need to tackle this emergency," NHS Director Stephen Powis said during a press briefing, the BBC News reported.

One of these false ideas purports that the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, started in Wuhan because of the recent rollout of 5G there, before spreading to other 5G-enabled cities, The Verge reported. However, The Verge points out, "These false conspiracy theories neglect to mention that a highly contagious virus would naturally spread more in densely populated cities with access to 5G, and that the coronavirus pandemic has hit countries like Iran and Japan where 5G isn't in use yet."

—A criminal investigation has been launched into the handling of the COVID-19 outbreak aboard the Ruby Princess cruise ship, as its 2,700 passengers were allowed to disembark in Sydney on March 19, despite showing respiratory symptoms. At least 62 people linked to the cruise ship have tested positive for the virus, according to The Guardian.

"The only way I can get to the bottom of whether our national biosecurity laws and our state laws were broken is through a criminal investigation," said Mike Fuller, Commissioner of the New South Wales Police Force, as reported by The Guardian. "The key question that remains unanswered … Was Carnival transparent in contextualizing the true patient and crew health conditions relevant to COVID-19?"

‘Don’t go to the grocery store,’ Dr. Birx says, Most Americans staying at home

—Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said today at a press briefing that three U.S. hotspots — New York City, Louisiana and Detroit — are likely to hit their peaks in cases and deaths in the next six or seven days, NPR reported.

—Birx emphasized the importance of following the mitigation measures strictly over the next two weeks, saying: "The next two weeks are extraordinarily important. This is the moment to not be going to the grocery store, not going to the pharmacy, but doing everything you can to keep your family and your friends safe and that means everybody doing the six-feet distancing, washing their hands," NPR reported.

—A HuffPo/YouGov survey found that 87% of Americans say they are staying home as much as possible and most say they'd continue to do so even if official orders were lifted, HuffPo reported.

—In the U.K., 708 virus-related deaths were reported Friday, including the death of a 5-year-old with underlying health conditions, BBC News reported. The U.K. has now confirmed nearly 42,500 cases and 4,320 deaths from COVID-19, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

China donates 1,000 ventilators to NYC, New Orleans has sky-high death rate

—The Chinese government and the billionaire founders of the online marketplace Alibaba are sending 1,000 ventilators to New York City; they are expected to arrive at JFK Airport today, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. In addition, Oregon has said the state will send 140 ventilators to the city, ABC News reported.

—The 1,000-bed Navy ship hospital, the USNS Comfort, was tasked with helping the NYC health care system by caring for non-COVID-19 patients; however, on Thursday (April 2), just 20 patients were onboard because of the harsh criteria for who could and could not be treated there. That should change with updated guidelines: "Screening for care on the USNS Comfort will be modified and will now occur pier-side in an effort to reduce the backlog at some of the nearby New York hospitals. The screening effort for the USNS Comfort will no longer require a negative test, but each patient will still be screened by temperature and a short questionnaire," the U.S. Department of Defense said in a statement.

—Hundreds of service members cheered for the recently ousted Navy captain, Brett Crozier, who was relieved of his command after sending a letter asking for help due to an outbreak of COVID-19 on the carrier, Live Science reported

—Two parishes in Louisiana, in the New Orleans area, have the highest COVID-19 death rate per capita in the United States, according to The Wall Street Journal. For instance, St. John the Baptist Parish has a death rate per capita of nearly 40 virus-related deaths per 100,000 people; Orleans Parish has a death rate from the virus of nearly 38 per 100,000 individuals, the WSJ reported.

4 billion people under lockdown, Brazil expects surge in COVID-19 cases

—Nearly 4 billion people on the planet are under lockdown measures, according to The New York Times. Some U.S. states have yet to order state-wide lockdowns, including North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa. On Friday, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey announced a state-wide stay-at-home order effective 5 p.m. today.

—More than 1.1 million people worldwide have been confirmed to have the novel coronavirus to date, with more than 60,000 dying as a result. Italy and Spain each have surpassed the 100,000 mark for confirmed cases, while Germany is not far behind. The U.S. has now reported nearly 279,000 cases, with more than 100,000 of those in New York, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

—Brazil could see a surge in cases in the coming days and weeks; scientists and doctors say that lack of testing and underreporting suggest the scale of the outbreak there could be far greater than anyone realizes, The Guardian reported. The first known COVID-19 case in an indigenous person was reported in Brazil, in a 20-year-old woman from the Kokoma tribe, Live Science reported

—An uber-exclusive country club in Brazil has also been struck by the novel coronavirus. Officials say at least 60 of the Rio de Janeiro Country Club’s 850 members have tested positive for COVID-19, The Guardian reported.

CDC now recommends people wear cloth face coverings in public

— The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends that people wear cloth face coverings in public settings where it's difficult to socially distance from others such as in grocery stores and pharmacies, according to the CDC's website. "The virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms," they wrote.

— There are now over 7,000 people who died in the U.S. from COVID-19, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are nearly 274,000 cases nationwide and around 9,500 who have recovered from the infection. 

— Missouri Governor Mike Parson issued a statewide stay-at-home order starting on Monday, April 6. 

Even if you test negative for COVID-19, assume you have it, experts say

— Asymptomatic people may be fueling the coronavirus spread, according to another Live Science report. For every person who tested positive for the coronavirus in China, there were likely another five to eight asymptomatic people who didn't know they had the infection, according to a new study.

— Even if you test negative for COVID-19, assume you have it, experts say, according to another Live Science report. That's because diagnostic tests for the novel coronavirus may give false-negative results about 30% of the time.

— There are now 266,671 COVID-19 cases in the U.S., 6,921 deaths and 9,445 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— The protein that the coronavirus uses to attach to human cells has a compact "ridge" that allows it to attach more strongly to human cells than similar viruses, allowing it to infect better and spread faster, according to a Live Science report on a new study.

An Oregon man who just turned 104 might be one of the oldest survivors of COVID-19

— An Oregon World War II veteran who celebrated his 104th birthday on April 1, could be one of the oldest people in the world to survive the new coronavirus, according to The Oregonian.

— Spain recorded its first drop in daily deaths in four days, according to The Guardian. The country has nearly 118,000 cases of COVID-19 and 10,935 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Another 30,513 have recovered in the country.

— New York state had 562 COVID-19 deaths in the past 24 hours, the highest daily increase yet, Governor Andrew Cuomo said today during a briefing.

New York COVID-19 cases exceed 100,000

— There are now over 102,000 coronavirus cases and 2,935 deaths in New York state, Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a news briefing today. Over 57,000 of the positive COVID-19 cases are in New York City. 

— Delta airlines is giving passengers up to two years to rebook their flights originally booked for April or May of this year, according to their website, CNN reported.

— Governor Cuomo said he will sign an executive order that will allow New York to redistribute medical equipment from hospitals and companies that aren't using them to hospitals that need them right now, according to The New York Times.

White House recommends people wear cloth face masks while out in public

— COVID-19 cases in the U.S. now exceed 245,000, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are over 6,000 deaths and 9,000 recoveries in the country. There are now over 1 million cases worldwide.

— Austria will randomly test people for the coronavirus to get a better overview of how many people are infected in the country, according to CNN. The country currently has over 11,000 cases and 168 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— The White House has recommended people wear cloth face masks while out in public even if they aren't sick, according to The New York Times. But wearing face masks doesn't replace social distancing, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said on "Fox & Friends" this morning, according to CNN. Maintaining the six-foot physician distance is "the most important thing," Fauci said. Face masks are "an addendum and an addition to the physical separation, not as a substitute for it."

Healthy passengers on the Zaandam and Rotterdam cruise ships will be allowed to disembark

— Trump announced that he is approving Governor Andrew Cuomo's request to turn New York City's Javits Center into a coronavirus hospital, at a White House press briefing on April 2.

— Healthy passengers on the Zaandam and Rotterdam cruise ships will be allowed to disembark at Port Everglades in Florida and go straight to the airport to take a chartered flight home, according to CNN. The passengers who live in Florida will be given private transportation home and will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days. Those who have COVID-19 symptoms will remain on the ships until they can travel and 14 people will be taken to Broward Health, CNN reported.

— Those who receive social security and don't typically file tax returns will automatically receive the stimulus payments, the Treasury announced on Wednesday (April 1). Originally, the Internal Revenue Service had said everyone who qualified for the $1,200 stimulus checks needed to file a tax return, according to The Washington Post.

COVID-19 cases exceed 1 million worldwide

— There are now over 1 million COVID-19 cases worldwide, according to a Live Science report. That's 10 times more cases than the world reported a month ago.

— A 20-year-old woman from the Kokama tribe in Brazil tested positive for the coronavirus, becoming the first indigenous case of the coronavirus in the Amazon,  according to The Guardian. Health experts fear that the spread of the coronavirus could be devastating for indigenous communities in Brazil, they reported.

— The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized the first antibody test to detect COVID-19, according to a statement. This test, produced by the biotech company Cellex, could be used to detect people who have already had COVID-19.

Over 50,000 people have died from COVID-19 worldwide

— Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of President Donald Trump's coronavirus task force is facing threats to his safety, according to The Washington Post. Fauci now requires increased security, even at his home, according to CNN.

— There are now over 50,000 people who have died from COVID-19-related complications worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Another 204,605 have recovered.

— New York will run out of ventilators in six days, if the rate of ventilator-use continues as it has been, Governor Andrew Cuomo said today (April 2). “If a person comes in and needs a ventilator and you don’t have a ventilator, the person dies,” Cuomo said during a news briefing. “That’s the blunt equation here."

Panama imposes new gender-based restrictions

— In Panama, women will only be allowed to leave their homes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays whereas men will only be allowed to leave on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, according to new restrictions put in place, the New York Times reported. Everyone is required to stay at home on Sundays.

— There are over 92,000 coronavirus cases and 2,373 deaths in New York, according to the latest update from New York governor Andrew Cuomo, CNN reported.

— China's Jia county, with around 600,000 residents, has been placed under lockdown after reports of COVID-19 cases in a nearby hospital, according to the South China Morning Post. The country has seen a major decline in COVID-19 cases and has been slowly opening back up, but there are still fears of a second wave of illness.

COVID-19 cases near 1 million worldwide

— There are now over 952,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Over 48,000 people have died and over 202,000 have recovered. There are nearly 217,000 cases in the U.S., over 5,000 deaths and over 8,600 recoveries.

— Spain reported 950 new COVID-19 deaths on Thursday, bringing the country’s total deaths to over 10,000, according to The Washington Post.

— Adam Schlesinger, an Oscar-nominated songwriter and co-founder of Fountains of Wayne (best known for its 2003 song “Stacy’s Mom”) died yesterday (April 1) from complications related to the coronavirus, according to CNN. Schlesinger was 52.

— Over 6.6 million people in the U.S. filed for unemployment last week, the highest number ever recorded, according to The Washington Post.

A 6-week-old baby died from complications related to COVID-19 in Connecticut

— A 6-week-old baby died from complications related to COVID-19 in Connecticut, according to an announcement from Governor Ned Lamont on Twitter.  "We believe this is one of the youngest lives lost anywhere due to complications relating to COVID-19," he wrote.

— There are over 932,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases around the world, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Over 46,800 people have died and over 193,000 have recovered from the virus, according to the dashboard.

— California schools will remain closed for the rest of the school year, Governor Gavin Newsom said today during a briefing

There are now over 200,000 COVID-19 cases in the U.S.

— The U.S. has passed 200,000 COVID-19 cases, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. Over 4,500 people have died and over 8,400 people have recovered from the virus.

— Preliminary data shows that the curve of infections is flattening in the San Francisco Bay area and Washington state, two weeks after the states issued stay-at-home measures, suggesting that mandatory social distancing measures are working, according to The Washington Post

— Up to 25 % of people with COVID-19 may not show any symptoms, according to a Live Science report. "That's important, because now you have individuals that may not have any symptoms that can contribute to transmission," Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told NPR this week.

— The U.S. Coast Guard has told all cruise ships that they must remain at sea "indefinitely" and prepare to treat their sick passengers and crew on board their ships during the pandemic, according to the Associated Press.

— Americans who are on Social Security now need to file a tax return in order to receive the $1,200 stimulus check, according to The Washington Post. And most high school seniors and college students won't receive any money, they wrote.

Florida issues a state-wide stay-at-home order

— Florida's Governor Ron DeSantis declared a state-wide stay-at-home order today (April 1) after mounting criticism that he hadn't done so yet. Starting on Thursday at midnight people are ordered to stay home unless they are taking part in essential activities. 

—  Two Holland America cruise ships, Zaandam and Rotterdam are making their way toward Ft. Lauderdale, Florida after having been rejected at several other ports in South America,  but are still awaiting a decision as to whether or not they will be allowed to dock in the state, according to The Washington Post. Another cruise ship, The Carol Princess is also expected to arrive to Florida in a couple of days. There are at least 15 ships still out at sea across the world (some with passengers) that are being denied entry at ports, according to CNN.

— Cases in Italy are now peaking, with the daily death toll remaining steady rather than increasing and the daily number of cases now in decline, according to The Financial Times

— The coronavirus cases in Massachusetts will likely peak sometime in mid-April, epidemiologists predict, according to The Boston Globe.

Wimbledon is canceled

— The Wimbledon Championships, which were set to be held from June 28 to July 11 are canceled, according to a statement

— Government officials around the world advised people against making April Fools' Day jokes about the coronavirus, according to The Washington Post. "It's against the law to fake having COVID-19 this April Fools' Day," the Thai government wrote on Twitter. Not everyone got the message. South Korean singer Kim Jae-joong said he had COVID-19 and later said it was a joke, according to the Post.

— The U.S. has surpassed 190,000 COVID-19 cases, around 76,000 of those cases are in New York, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Over 4,100 people have died across the country, including 1,714 in New York.

“COVID-19 is the greatest test that we have faced together since the formation of the United Nations” in 1945, the secretary general of the UN says

— There are over 874,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, 43,291 deaths and over 185,000 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. The U.S. has nearly 190,000 cases, over 4,000 deaths and over 7,000 recoveries.

— Spain has exceeded 102,000 cases, 9,000 deaths and over 22,600 recoveries. Italy has nearly 106,000 cases, over 12,400 deaths and nearly 16,000 recoveries. The numbers are also climbing in other European countries: Germany has over 72,000 cases and France has nearly 53,000.

— While other European countries have enforced lockdowns on people to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Sweden has not (though public gatherings of over 50 people are prohibited). The Swedish government left it up to the residents to act responsibly —  social distance, work from home and self-isolate if you’re over the age of 70 —  without putting many restrictions in place, according to NBC News

— The world economy has entered a recession that it likely won’t recover from until 2021, the International Monetary Fund declared, according to The New York Times

—  “COVID-19 is the greatest test that we have faced together since the formation of the United Nations” in 1945, António Guterres, the secretary general of the United Nations, said on Wednesday, according to a statement.

Even with mitigation efforts, over 100,000 people can die in the U.S. from the coronavirus, the White House said today

— Even with mitigation efforts, an estimated 100,000 to 240,000 people can die from the coronavirus in the U.S., the White House task force announced at a briefing today (March 31). But without mitigation efforts, 1.5 million to 2.2 million could have died, the models suggested, according to a Live Science report.

— The next two weeks are going to be "very, very painful" and "rough," Trump said today during the briefing.

— California is releasing 3,500 inmates early in order to prevent the coronavirus from spreading as efficiently through crowded prisons, according to the Los Angeles Times.

— Las Vegas has created a makeshift shelter in a parking lot — with spaces drawn 6 feet apart — to house homeless people after a shelter was closed because of a coronavirus case, according to The Guardian.

— Macy's is furloughing most of its 125,000 employees, according to CNN.

Russia is sending medical equipment and protective gear to the U.S.

— Dr. James Goodrich, the neurosurgeon who separated conjoined twins died on Monday (March 31) from COVID-19 complications, according to CNN.

— Russia is sending medical equipment and protective gear to the U.S. on a plane that will take off today, the Kremlin said, according to The Washington Post.  Russia's president Vladimir Putin, agreed to send supplies to the U.S. if the U.S. reciprocates with its own supplies should Russia need it one day.

— Cases in the U.S. have surpassed 180,000, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. There are 3,606 deaths and 6,038 recoveries in the country.

— Around 500 additional emergency medical technicians and paramedics will begin working in NYC in response to the record number of 911 calls that are being reported, Mayor Bill de Blasio said today. In addition, thousands of nurses will be coming to the city to help.

Six feet may not be enough space for social distancing, experts say

— Chris Cuomo, a CNN anchor and brother of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, tested positive for COVID-19, he wrote in a Twitter post.

— William Helmreich, a well-known sociologist who walked every block of NYC and has published nearly 20 books, died on Saturday morning from the coronavirus, according to CNN. He was 74 years old.

— Six feet may not be enough space for social distancing, according to a Live Science report. The best way to ensure safety is to stay indoors and away from other people as much as possible, according to the report.

— The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is currently reconsidering its guidance that people don't need to wear masks when they're out of their homes, according to NPR.

There are now over 800,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide

— Two Holland America cruise ships, Zaandam and Rotterdam are making their way toward Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The ships are carrying 193 passengers and crew who have influenza-like illness, including eight people who have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a blog post from Orlando Ashford, the president of Holland America Line.

— There are now over 800,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Over 39,000 people have died — around 11,500 of those in Italy and around 8,000 in Spain— and 173,000 have recovered. There are nearly 165,000 cases in the U.S. alone, with over 67,000 of those cases in New York. Over 3,000 people have died in the U.S.

Coronavirus rising in military personnel

—COVID-19 infections are on the rise in active military personnel, according to the news site Stars and Stripes. Due to rising coronavirus cases among crew, the 5,000-person aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt is sitting at a dock in Guam instead of patrolling the Pacific and South China Sea, Stars and Stripes reported. In early March, there were 16 known cases onboard.

—Details about how many service members have contracted the novel coronavirus is not widely known, as the Pentagon has ordered military bases and command centers to withhold certain information. "As we confront this growing crisis, and out of a concern for operational security with regard to readiness, we will not report the aggregate number of individual service member cases at individual unit, base or Combatant Commands," Department of Defense Press Secretary Alyssa Farah said in a statement. "We will continue to do our best to balance transparency in this crisis with operational security."

According to The Hill, "As of Monday morning, 569 active-duty service members have contracted the illness, as had 220 civilian personnel, 190 family members and 64 contractors."

—A New Jersey Army National Guardsman died on Saturday (March 28) as a result of COVID-19. The individual had been in the hospital after testing positive for the virus since March 21, according to a Department of Defense statement.

A Colorado ski town will test all of its residents for the coronavirus

— Maryland, Virginia and Washington D.C. issued stay-at-home orders today, according to CNN

— Telluride, a Colorado ski town, will test all of its residents for the coronavirus for free, according to a Live Science report. The town, with 8,000 residents, is the first in the country to perform such wide-scale coronavirus testing.

— There are now nearly 160,000 COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and nearly 3,000 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Over 5,500 people in the country have already recovered from the virus.

— COVID-19 cases in Italy surpassed 100,000 on Monday, according to the dashboard. The country has had over 11,500 deaths and 14,620 recoveries.

There are 36,221 COVID-19 cases in NYC and 790 deaths

— Nearly 12,300 health workers in Spain have tested positive for COVID-19, deputy health emergency chief Maria Jose Sierra said at a news conference on Monday (March 30), according to Reuters. That means health care workers make up 14% of the country's over 85,000 cases.

— Phuket, a popular tourist destination island in Thailand, banned air travel starting on April 10, Governor Phakaphong Tavipatana said. The island also closed all entry and exit points until the end of April, according to The San Jose Mercury News.

— Country folk singer-songwriter John Prine was hospitalized on Thursday after a "sudden onset" of COVID-19 symptoms, his family wrote on his official Twitter page. He was intubated on Saturday evening and is in "critical" condition, they wrote.

— Prince Charles, who tested positive for COVID-19 last week, after consulting with his doctor, is now out of self-isolation and in good health, according to CNN.

— There are 36,221 COVID-19 cases in NYC and 790 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. But while the number of hospitalizations continues to rise, the rate of rise is slowing down, Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a news briefing today. The number of hospitalizations had been doubling every two or three days and now it's doubling every six days, he said. 

NYC is setting up a field hospital in Central Park

— The USNS Comfort, a navy ship, equipped with 1,000 hospital beds and 12 operating rooms and a radiology suite arrived in New York City today. It will act as a floating hospital for patients not affected by COVID-19, according to Live Science

— Anyone entering Vermont is required to quarantine for 14 days, Governor Phil Scott announced today.

— NYC is setting up a field hospital with 68 beds in Central Park to help accommodate coronavirus patients, Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Sunday, CNN reported

Spain's case count surpasses China's, President Trump extends social distancing guidelines to the end of April

— Yesterday, President Trump extended social distancing guidelines to April 30. Earlier, he had said the country could ease the guidelines as early as Easter, according to The New York Times.

— There are over 735,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, nearly 35,000 deaths and 156,000 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are over 143,000 cases in the U.S., over 2,500 deaths and nearly 5,000 recoveries.

— Spain has reached 85,195 cases, surpassing China. The country has 7,340 deaths and 16,780 recoveries.

— The Tokyo Olympics, originally scheduled for July 24, 2020 will now open on July 23, 2021, the organizers announced.

— South Korea is seeing an increase in infections near Seoul, officials in South Korea said, according to The Washington Post. The country has previously been commended for its response to the outbreak.

Moscow orders quarantine on residents

— Moscow ordered a quarantine on all of its residents starting on March 30, Mayor Sergey Sobyanin said in a statement. People will only be allowed to leave their houses to get medical help, go to a nearby grocery store or pharmacy and walk their pets near their homes, according to CNN.

— There are now over 716,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, nearly 34,000 deaths and around 149,000 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are over 137,000 cases in the U.S., over 2,400 deaths and 2,660 recoveries.

— Holland America's "Zaandam" cruise ship — on which two passengers tested positive for COVID-19 and four passengers died from unclear reasons —  will be allowed to transit the Panama Canal and head to Florida, according to The New York Times.

The U.S. could eventually face over 100,000 COVID-19 deaths, Dr. Anthony Fauci says

— The U.S. could eventually face over 100,000 COVID-19 deaths, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said on CNN's State of the Union.

— The USNS Comfort, a navy ship, with 1,000 hospital beds will arrive tomorrow in New York City, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a briefing today. The ship will not house COVID-19 patients but other patients who need hospital care, he said.

— People driving into Florida may be screened and will be required to complete a traveler form that includes contact information and trip details, according to a statement from the Florida Department of Transportation. Anyone arriving in Florida from states that are hit hard with COVID-19 cases such as Louisiana, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut will be required to isolate for 14 days.

Americans expected to receive direct deposits of stimulus checks within three weeks

—The U.S. health department's civil rights office is opening up investigations to make sure states aren't allowing medical providers to discriminate against people based on disabilities, race, age or other factors when treating them for the coronavirus, according to The New York Times.

— 730 uniformed NYPD officers and 96 civilian NYPD employees are infected with the coronavirus, according to a law enforcement official, CNN reported.

— Americans who are eligible can expect direct deposits of the stimulus checks within three weeks, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said on Sunday, according to CBS News.

CDC issues a travel advisory for those in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut

—There are nearly 680,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, over 31,700 deaths and 145,600 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. There are nearly 125,000 cases in the U.S., over 2,190 deaths and 2,600 recoveries.

— Yesterday, President Trump said “a quarantine will not be necessary” in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut after mentioning that he was considering one, according to his Twitter. Instead, the CDC issued a “domestic travel advisory” which urges residents of the three states to “refrain from non-essential domestic travel for 14 days effective immediately.” This does not include people working in critical infrastructure industries such as public health professionals and those working in food supply, trucking and financial services.

— Hundreds of thousands of migrants in India are migrating home on foot after being left homeless and jobless by the nationwide lockdown of the country, according to The New York Times. The country’s homeless population —  one of the largest in the world —  may have tripled overnight, according to the Times.

An Illinois infant with COVID-19 has died

— An Illinois infant has died from the coronavirus, according to Illinois health officials. That's the first known infant death from the coronavirus in the U.S, according to NBC Chicago

— There are now nearly 120,000 cases of COVID-19 in the U.S., nearly 2,000 deaths and over 920 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. The number of cases exceed 657,000 worldwide.

— New York City officials will decide this weekend if they should start fining ($500) people who aren't adhering to social distancing rules, according to The New York Times.

— In South Korea, more coronavirus patients recovered and were discharged (4,811 people) than were undergoing treatment (around 4,500 people) on Saturday, according to The Washington Post.

First cat tests positive for the coronavirus in Belgium

— A cat in Belgium tested positive for the coronavirus, the first cat to test positive, according to The Guardian. A week after the cat's owner developed symptoms, the cat also developed symptoms, virologist Steven Van Gucht said during a press conference. But "there are no indications that this is common," he said. Also, the virus transferred from the human to the cat not the other way around, similar to other pet transmissions. "We therefore consider the risk to people to be small," he said.

President Donald Trump said on Saturday that he's thinking about enacting a short-term quarantine in parts of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut hit with many COVID-19 cases, according to CNN. But shortly after, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said, "I don’t know how that could be legally enforceable," according to The New York Times.

— There are now over 115,000 COVID-19 cases in the U.S. with 1,891 deaths and 921 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. Cases in Italy have exceeded 92,000 and deaths have exceeded 10,000.

Spain health officials say they might be approaching the peak of the outbreak

— President Donald Trump approved Masscahusetts and Michigans' requests for disaster declarations, according to The Washington Post. This would give the states some federal assistance to help areas badly afflicted by the coronavirus, according to WCVB-TV.

— There are over 72,000 COVID-19 cases in Spain, 5,690 deaths and over 12,200 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. "We are approaching, we do not know exactly when we will have confirmation, but we are reaching the peak of the curve," the director of Spain’s Center for Health Emergencies Fernando Simón said at a news conference in Madrid, according to CNN.

— Russia will temporarily close its borders— suspending traffic — starting on March 30, according to CNN.

COVID-19 cases reach nearly 615,000 worldwide

— There are nearly 615,000 COVID-19 cases, over 28,600 deaths and nearly 135,700 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. In the U.S. there are nearly 105,000 cases with around 46,000 of those cases in New York state.

— Houses of worship may be fined or shut down if police discover people congregating there this weekend, Mayor Bill de Blasio said, the New York Times reported.

— Domestic violence is likely to increase during these lockdowns amid the coronavirus pandemic, the United Nations said, according to CNN. “It is very likely that rates of widespread domestic violence will increase, as already suggested by initial police and hotline reports," UN Special Rapporteur on violence against women, Dubravka Simonovic, said in a statement Friday. "As making phone calls might be dangerous in a context of home confinement, helplines can facilitate access by providing online chats and texting services for victims, States should also come up with new and creative solutions to support them."

Trump invokes Defense Production Act, US coronavirus cases surpass 100K

— The number of COVID-19 cases in the United States has now surpassed 100,000, according to Johns Hopkins University.

— President Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to require General Motors to make ventilators after saying that the company was not acting quickly enough to produce the machines, according to CNBC.

— Over the next 100 days the United States expects to either make or acquire over 100,000 additional ventilators, President Trump said in a White House news briefing. The U.S. typically makes about 29,000 ventilators a year.

Italy reported 919 deaths in a single day, the highest daily death toll reported by any country

— Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt suspended elective surgeries including abortions unless they pose serious health risks to the mother, according to a statement.

— Italy reported 919 deaths in a single day, the highest daily death toll reported by any country, according to The Washington Post.

— The death toll in Spain is nearing 5,000. Spain has reported over 64,000 COVID-19 cases and over 9,300 recoveries. 

— Four passengers died aboard Holland America's "Zaandam" cruise ship off the coast of Panama, the company announced. Though it's unclear if they died from COVID-19, two passengers on board tested positive for the disease, CNBC reported.

Congress approved a $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill

— The U.S. House of Representatives approved a $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill to combat the coronavirus pandemic, according to the New York Times. The next step is for President Trump to sign the bill.

— On Friday, Apple released a website and an app which allows users to screen themselves for coronavirus symptoms, according to CNN Business.

— The global death toll from COVID-19 has surpassed 25,000 according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. Italy, with 86,498 confirmed cases of COVID-19, surpassed China. The U.S. with over 94,000 cases, continues to be the country with the most cases.

— The first patients have been enrolled in a drug trial by the World Health Organization testing four drugs to fight COVID-19, according to CNBC. The drugs include the antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, an antiviral known as Remdesivir and HIV drugs Lopinavir and Ritonavir and a combination of drugs along with interferon-beta.

COVID-19 cases in the U.S. have now exceeded 86,000

— COVID-19 cases likely won't peak in New York for another 21 days, Governor Andrew Cuomo said today. At the outbreak's peak, the state will need about 140,000 beds, or about 87,000 more than it has right now.

— A poll conducted by the Washington Post and ABC News finds that 9 in 10 Americans are staying home as much as possible and social distancing, according to The Washington Post.

— COVID-19 cases in the U.S. have now exceeded 86,000. The U.S. has reported 1,301 deaths and 753 recoveries as of noon on Friday, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— States aren't testing uniformly for the coronavirus, creating a distorted picture of the outbreak in the U.S., according to a Live Science report

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for the coronavirus

— British prime minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a statement he gave on Twitter. “Over the last 24 hours I have developed mild symptoms and tested positive for coronavirus,” he wrote. “I am now self-isolating, but I will continue to lead the government’s response via video-conference as we fight this virus.”

— There are now nearly 550,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, over 24,300 deaths and over 127,500 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. The U.S. has 86,000 confirmed cases, 1,300 deaths and 753 recoveries.

—Crime rates have recently increased across Europe amid the coronavirus outbreak, Europol, the European Union’s law enforcement agency said in a report. "Criminals have been quick to seize opportunities to exploit the crisis by adapting their modi operandi or engaging in new criminal activities," they wrote. Crimes such as cyberattacks, fraud schemes, scams, sale of counterfeit healthcare and sanitary products and organized property theft are likely to increase even more, they wrote and CNN reported.

The U.S. is the new epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic

— The U.S. now has at least 82,174 COVID-19 cases, more than any other country in the world, according to a Live Science report. Nearly half of all U.S. coronavirus cases are in New York state.

— Montana governor Steve Bullock issued a stay-at-home order for residents starting on Saturday, March 28. Montana currently has 90 cases, according to the state's dashboard.

— Coronavirus could be catastrophic for great apes, experts warned. Great-ape tourism should be suspended and field research should be reduced, they said, according to a Live Science report.

— As the coronavirus sweeps through the U.S., the country faces a shortage of ventilators. It's possible to use a single ventilator between 4 patients as a temporary fix, but it could be disastrous, according to a Live Science report

— The number of patients on ventilators at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center has more than doubled, Dr. Craig Smith, chair of the department of surgery said in a statement and CNN reported.

New Hampshire governor orders people to stay at home and non-essential businesses to close

— The number of COVID-19 cases in Italy is still rising, but the day-to-day rise is slowing down, according to The Washington Post. Still, experts warn that if the nation loosens its measures to contain and mitigate the virus, cases will shoot right back up again.

— The U.S. has nearly 80,000 COVID-19 cases, following close behind Italy and China's case count, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. Italy has about 800 cases more and China has about 2,000 cases more than the U.S. 

— New Hampshire governor Chris Sununu ordered residents to stay at home and nonessential businesses to close by Friday, in a news briefing on Thursday. 

Global COVID-19 cases have surpassed half a million

— Other states should prepare for a coronavirus outbreak as large as that in New York, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, according to NPR.

— While New York has nearly half of all the COVID-19 cases in the U.S., Louisiana is facing the fastest growth of new cases in the world, according to The New York Times. As of Thursday morning, Louisiana had nearly 1,800 cases of COVID-19.

— Global COVID-19 cases have surpassed 500,000, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. China still leads the way with the most number of cases, but Italy is close behind, followed by the U.S.

— China will temporarily ban foreign nationals with visas and resident permits from entering the country, according to The Washington Post.

NYC homeless man dies of COVID-19

— A New York City homeless man in his 60s with COVID-19 died at a hospital, becoming the first known fatality among New York City's homeless population, according to NBC News.

— Vietnam is ordering tens of thousands of people returning to the country to quarantine in camps, according to Reuters. Passengers are undergoing screenings and if they have symptoms they are taken to a hospital. If they don't, they are taken to quarantine camps where they share rooms with 10 to 20 others on their same flight. The country has only reported 148 infections and no deaths, according to its health ministry.

— Recent news reports claimed that the coronavirus may have infected half of the UK population, but that's probably not true, according to Live Science. The reports are based on a hypothetical scenario proposed by a new study that hasn't yet been peer-reviewed. The scenario is based on several major assumptions, according to Live Science.

COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. exceed 1,000

— There are now 487,648 confirmed cases of COVID-19, over 22,000 deaths and nearly 118,000 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard

— Deaths from COVID-19 in the U.S. have exceeded 1,000. There are now over 69,000 cases in the country, with around 33,000 of them in New York state.

— There were 3.3 million unemployment claims filed in the U.S. last week, the highest number of unemployment claims filed since the Department of Labor started tracking in 1967, according to CNN.

Nearly 70% of hotel rooms in the U.S. were empty last week

— Nearly 70% of hotel rooms in the U.S. were vacant last week, according to new data from the data and analytics group STR, according to CNN.

— Filming of "The Batman," which was set for release in 2021, shut down until "it is safe for us all to resume," filmmaker Matt Reeves wrote on Twitter.

— Americans with incomes below $100,000 will likely receive checks or direct deposits of $1,200 each within the next three weeks under a rescue package deal, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said at a news briefing on Wednesday, The New York Times reported

— There are now nearly 467,000 COVID-19 cases worldwide, over 21,000 deaths and nearly 114,000 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

Over 1 million Californians have applied for unemployment since March 13

— California distributed 24.5 million N95 masks and ordered 100 million more, Governor Gavin Newsom announced today

— California homeowners struggling to make monthly payments because of the coronavirus outbreak may receive some help— delay in foreclosures or mortgage relief—  from certain banks and financial institutions, Governor Gavin Newsom announced today, according to the Los Angeles Times. Over 1 million people in California have applied for unemployment benefits since March 13, according to CNN.

— There are nearly 63,000 COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and 894 deaths as of Wednesday afternoon, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

Medical students will be allowed to graduate early to help combat the coronavirus

— Medical students will be allowed to graduate from New York University earlier than scheduled in May so that they can help combat the coronavirus outbreak, according to a statement from the school.

— The rate of hospitalizations from COVID-19 seem to be slowing down in New York, which might mean that social distancing and closures of businesses among other measures are actually working, Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a briefing today. "This is a very good sign," Cuomo said. "I'm not 100% sure it holds or it's accurate, but the arrows are headed in the right direction."

— The coronavirus isn't mutating quickly, according to experts who are closely monitoring its genetic code for changes, according to the Washington Post. This means that the virus is unlikely to become more or less dangerous as time goes by and that potential vaccines could be more long-lasting, according to the report.

— Spain has now 47,610 cases and 3,434 confirmed deaths from COVID-19, becoming the second country (after Italy) to surpass China's death toll, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— Italy now has 74,386 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 7,503 deaths, according to the dashboard.

Germany death rate is lower than other countries likely because of early, meticulous measures taken

— Germany has nearly 34,000 cases of COVID-19 but only 171 deaths. Early in the infection spread, Germany tested and isolated extensively and meticulously, which might have kept the death rate, around 0.5%,  as low as it is, according to Live Science.

— Yesterday, LA County reported a COVID-19 death in a person under 18 years of age. But the case "will require further evaluation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention," the County of LA Public Health department said in a statement released today. "Though early tests indicated a positive result for COVID-19, the case is complex and there may be an alternate explanation for this fatality."

— Within days, 15-minute home test kits for COVID-19 will be available to the British public, a Public Health England director said, according to The Independent.

COVID-19 cases exceed 435,000 worldwide

— There are not over 435,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, over 19,600 deaths and nearly 112,000 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. The U.S. has over 55,000 cases and over 800 deaths.

— A group of young adults in Kentucky threw a “coronavirus party” together to purposefully go against state guidance to socially distance, Governor Andy Beshear said on Tuesday. At least one person who went to that party is now infected with COVID-19. "This is one that makes me mad, and it should make you mad," Beshear said. 

— After days of negotiations, the White House and Senate agreed on a $2 trillion stimulus deal, one of the most expensive and extensive measures taken to date, to help the economy amid the coronavirus crisis,  according to CNN

— Prince Charles, the heir to the British throne, has tested positive for the coronavirus, has mild symptoms and is self-isolating in Scotland with the Duchess of Cornwall who tested negative, according to a spokesman, BBC reported.

LA County reports the death of a person under 18

— Los Angeles County officials reported the death of a Lancaster resident under the age of 18 years old, according to a news release from The Los Angeles County Public Health Department. This person, most likely a teenager, is one of the youngest to die from COVID-19 in the U.S., according to The New York Times.

— Anyone who has recently left New York City should self-quarantine for 14 days, White House officials said during a press briefing on Tuesday (March 24). New York has 25,677 confirmed cases of COVID-19, almost half of all the cases in the U.S., according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. Almost 15,000 of those cases are in New York City.

— A group of U.S. restaurants has named today, March 24, the "Great American Takeout Day," to support restaurants amid the coronavirus outbreak, according to the San Jose Mercury News.

Elon Musk plans to distribute 1,200 ventilators this week

— Some amount of mandatory social distancing, quarantining and travel restrictions could remain in place for months to come, according to a new Live Science report.

— Elon Musk plans to distribute over 1,200 ventilators made by both SpaceX and Tesla this week, according to Space.com.

— A man in Arizona died and his wife was hospitalized after they both self-medicated with chloroquine phosphate, a chemical that's used to treat fish for parasites, in an effort to prevent the coronavirus, according to Live Science. They had watched President Donald Trump tout the medication form of chloroquine, an antimalarial drug, as a promising treatment for COVID-19 during press conferences. Clinical trials are underway but the FDA has not yet approved the drug for the treatment of COVID-19. 

Trump said he wants the country "opened up" by Easter

— President Trump said that he wanted the U.S. "opened up" by Easter (April 12), during a Fox News town hall on Tuesday. That's much sooner than the milestones other U.S. officials have set, according to NPR.

— Coronavirus RNA was found in the Princess Cruise ship up to 17 days after the passengers disembarked from the ship, according to a new analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But it's not clear if the virus could remain viable for that long.

— Almost half of Americans will be under an order to stay at home by mid-week, according to an analysis by CNN.

India locks down entire country of 1.3 billion people

— India announced a 21-day lockdown for its 1.3 billion residents on Tuesday. There will be a total ban of leaving your homes, India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Tuesday.

— The Trump administration will use the Defense Production Act for the first time on Tuesday to obtain 60,000 coronavirus test kits, according to the Wall Street Journal

— New York will begin to collect plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients to give as treatment to those still infected with the disease, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced on Monday. This treatment, known as convalescent plasma, was used for centuries, such as during the flu epidemic of 1918, according to NBC News

The U.S. could potentially become a new epicenter for the coronavirus, WHO says

— Manu Dibango, a world-renowned Cameroonian jazz musician died of COVID-19 on Tuesday, according to his official Facebook Page.

— The U.S. which is seeing a "very large acceleration" in COVID-19 infections, could potentially become the new epicenter for the coronavirus, Margaret Harris, the World Health Organization spokesman told reporters on Tuesday, according to Reuters.

— Washington State's governor Jay Inslee announced a "stay home, stay healthy" order yesterday (March 23). You can still go outside, take a walk, ride a bike or garden "but you must remain six feet away from everyone at all times," he wrote on his Twitter page.

Public transport in Wuhan will start up again within 24 hours

— The summer Olympics in Japan which was set to take place in July will be postponed for a year, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said, according to The New York Times.

— Public transport will start up again within 24 hours in Wuhan, China, where the coronavirus outbreak began, and people will be allowed to leave the city starting on April 8, the Hubei provincial government announced Tuesday. 

— There are now 392,331 COVID-19 cases, 17,156 deaths and 102, 972 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

— On Monday, 602 people died in Italy which was the country's smallest increase for four days, Reuters reported. While there's also a decrease in case count, there's also a drop in the number of tests done, so it's too soon to say if the decline will continue, Silvio Brusaferro, the head of Italy's national health institute said.

Nearly 1 in 1,000 people are infected with the coronavirus in the New York metropolitan area

— Nearly 1 in 1,000 people are infected with the coronavirus in the New York metropolitan area, five times that of other areas, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House's coronavirus response coordinator said today at a briefing. 

— A man in South Carolina was arrested last Thursday (March 19) after he sent a fake doctor's note to his employer saying he had the coronavirus, according to The Post and Courier. He can now face up to 10 years in prison. 

— There are now over 375,000 COVID-19 cases, 16,371 deaths and 100,958 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. In the US there are 43,667 cases and 552 deaths.

— The Food and Drug Administration approved self-collected swabs for coronavirus testing, Vice President Mike Pence said today. People can now self-swab in clinics and drive-through tests, he said.

There are 86 clinical trials underway for COVID-19 treatments or vaccines

— As of Friday (March 20), there are 86 clinical trials of COVID-19 treatments or vaccines ongoing or recruiting patients, according to a new Live Science report

— New York is now requiring hospitals to increase their capacity by 50%, Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a news conference.

— There are now over 40,000 cases of COVID-19 in the U.S., half of them are in New York State, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. There are 12,305 COVID-19 cases specifically in New York City. 

Social distancing measures might already be flatting the curve in Germany

— Social distancing measures might already be helping to flatten the curve for the first time in Germany, according to Reuters."We see the trend that the exponential growth curve is somewhat flattening" in Germany, said Lothar Wieler, head of the Robert Koch Institute, a German federal government agency. “But I will only be able to confirm this trend definitively on Wednesday.”

— Indiana has issued a stay-at-home order (except for essential activities) starting on March 25 until April 7, governor Eric Holcomb announced today

— Boeing is temporarily suspending its production operations in the Puget Sound area in Washington, according to a statement. The suspension will be for 14 days, during which time they'll undergo deep-cleaning of sites and establish "rigorous criteria" for return to work, they wrote.

Massachusetts closes non-essential businesses

— Massachusetts joins a group of other states in closing non-essential businesses. The order will start on Tuesday at noon, Governor Charlie Baker announced today. Michigan also ordered residents to stay home "directing all Michigan businesses and operations to temporarily suspend in-person operations that are not necessary to sustain or protect life," according to a statement

— New York is now testing 16,000 people a day, "more than any other state in the United States," Governor Andrew Cuomo said today (March 23). 

— There are 59,138 COVID-19 cases and 5,476 deaths in Italy. There are 33,089 COVID-19 cases and 2,206 deaths in Spain, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

The U.S. has over 35,000 COVID-19 cases

— There are now 349,211 cases of COVID-19, 15,308 deaths and 100,165 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. The U.S. has over 35,000 cases and 471 deaths.

— Postponing the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo might be a possibility, Shinzo Abe,  Japan's prime minister, said to lawmakers, according to CNN. Up until now, Abe was adamant that the games would start as planned on July 24.

— A loss of smell and taste could be signs of COVID-19, the New York Times reported.

— Hong Kong is stopping all visitors from entering the city starting on Wednesday and banning the sale of alcohol at thousands of bars and restaurants, according to the South China Morning Post. These new regulations follow a spike of new COVID-19 cases, mostly from infected people coming into the country. 

Warmer weather might slow the coronavirus spread, an early study suggests

— Warmer weather might slow down the coronavirus spread, according to a new early analysis from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The scientists found that the most coronavirus transmissions around the world occurred in places with low temperatures, The New York Times reported.

— The government is activating the US National Guard in Washington, California and New York "to carry out approved missions to stop the virus," Trump said during a White House briefing today (March 22).

— New York state has nearly 15,800 cases of COVID-19 and 117 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

— Opera singer Plácido Domingo tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a Facebook post.

— Senate democrats blocked an economic rescue plan that was over $1.8 trillion, claiming it didn't protect workers like it should during the coronavirus outbreak and didn't impose strict-enough restrictions on businesses getting help from the government, according to the New York Times.

— Harvey Weinstein, who is serving a 23-year sentence for rape and sexual assault in a New York prison, has reportedly tested positive for the coronavirus, state prison officials told the Niagara Gazette. But Weinstein's spokesman, attorney or prison consultant couldn't confirm the news, according to Variety.

Ohio and Louisiana join other states in ordering residents to "stay at home"

— Senator Rand Paul has tested positive for COVID-19, according to a tweet. "He is feeling fine and is in quarantine," according to the tweet. "He is asymptomatic and was tested out of an abundance of caution due to his extensive travel and events."

— Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel is under self-quarantine after a doctor that gave her a pneumococcal vaccine on Friday tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a tweet from Steffen Seibert, the spokesman for the German government.

— Ohio residents must "stay at home," except for essential activities, Governor Mike DeWine announced on Sunday. Louisiana governor John Bel Edwards also announced a stay at home order for residents starting on Monday, March 23, according to a tweet.

Spain is extending its nationwide lockdown

— Ford, General Motors and Tesla "are being given the go ahead" to make ventilators and other products to help with the coronavirus, according to a tweet that President Trump sent out on Sunday (March 22).

— Spain will extend its nationwide lockdown by 15 days, making the measure last until April 11, according to The Washington Post. Spain has the second-most cases of COVID-19 in Europe, following behind Italy with 28,603 cases. Over 1,750 people have died in Spain and 2,575 have recovered. 

— Greece is enacting a nationwide non-essential movement ban starting on Monday, according to CNN. Only people that need to go to work, the supermarket, or to see healthcare providers are allowed to leave their house, Greece's Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis announced today. The country has 624 total COVID-19 cases.

Trump sends letter to North Korea, Russia sends help to Italy

— Russia is sending equipment and 100 doctors and virologists to Italy, a country that is still facing the worst of the new coronavirus, according to CNN. Italy now has over 53,500 cases and 4,825 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

— President Trump sent a letter to Kim Jong-un, North Korea's leader saying the U.S. would be willing to help North Korea combat the coronavirus, according to the New York Times. North Korea has not reported any COVID-19 cases so far.

— The U.S. has over 26,700 confirmed cases, 340 deaths and 176 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard. In a press conference, Mayor Bill de Blasio called New York City the "epicenter" of the outbreak in the U.S.

COVID-19 cases exceed 300,000 worldwide

— There are now over 300,000 COVID-19 cases and nearly 13,000 deaths worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. Nearly 92,000 people have recovered.

— Bolivia, a country with 19 confirmed cases of COVID-19, announced a 14-day mandatory nationwide quarantine, according to Reuters. Supermarkets, hospitals, banks and hospitals would remain open and the government would help families with children in need starting in April.

— The Federal Bureau of Prisons reported the first known case of an inmate in a federal prison who contracted the coronavirus. After complaining of chest pains, an inmate at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn was taken to a hospital where he tested positive for the virus, according to CNN.

— Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence have both tested negative for the virus, Katie Miller, his spokeswoman said on Twitter on Saturday. They were tested after an official in Mike Pence’s office tested positive for COVID-19.

1 in 5 Americans directed to 'stay at home'

—An official working in the office of Vice President Mike Pence has tested positive for COVID-19, though the person hadn’t come into close contact with Pence or the president, the Times reported.

—New guidelines in several states, including New York, California and Illinois, mean that about one in five Americans will be under directives to “stay at home” by the end of this weekend, the Times reported

—New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Saturday (Marcy 21) a list of potential locations for field hospitals to test for and treat COVID-19. One of those spots is Manhattan’s Javits Center (which is the venue for many events, including the city’s Comic-Con), where he hopes the 1.8 million-square-foot center could hold a total of 1,000 hospital beds, CBS New York reported. Other locations included: campuses at the State University New York (SUNY) Stony Brook and SUNY Westbury as well as the Westchester Convention Center.

Italy reports 793 deaths in a single day

— Italy recorded 793 deaths from COVID-19 within a single day, bringing the total death toll to 4,825. That's the highest recorded daily rise in the country to date, according to the Guardian.

— Thousands of the country's 450,000 National Guard members in at least 27 states have been called up to help in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, according to The New York Times.

—  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted "emergency use authorization" to California company Cepheid for a coronavirus test that can be conducted at the "point of care" for a patient and give results in 45 minutes, according to The Washington Post.

Some areas in the U.S. are restricting COVID-19 testing to health care workers and hospitalized people.

— New York State has a medical gown shortage, Governor Andrew Cuomo said in a press conference on Saturday  (March 21). We're doing better with ventilators, nowhere near where we need to be with ventilators, we need 30,000 ventilators, we're at 6,000," he said. "But at least we got to 6,000." They have also been making progress on finding more masks, he added. New York state is sending 1 million N95 masks to NYC, Cuomo said.

— Health officials across the country in areas particularly overwhelmed by COVID-19 cases such as New York and California, are restricting testing to health care workers and hospitalized people, according to the Washington Post.

— The organizers of the Tokyo Olympics 2020 are facing a lot of criticism after having not postponed or canceled the event in light of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the New York Times. Today, the U.S.A. Track and Field joined others in asking for the Olympics to be delayed, according to an email shared on Twitter.

US knew about COVID-19 dangers in January; Israel spy agency purchases tests

—U.S. intelligence reports reveal that back in January and February officials were warning about the global danger posed by the coronavirus that was spreading across China, according to news reports. "Taken together, the reports and warnings painted an early picture of a virus that showed the characteristics of a globe-encircling pandemic that could require governments to take swift actions to contain it," The Hour reported.

—As of March 21, Italy was reporting more than 47,000 cases, Spain with 21,571 cases, Iran with 20,610, Germany with 20,142 and the United States bumping up against 20,000 confirmed cases, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

—A 90-year-old woman who tested positive for the new coronavirus at a long-term care facility outside of Seattle, Washington, where an outbreak began in February, is expected to be symptom-free in the coming days, CBS News reported. "She will still need to stay in isolation until she goes through their protocol for being listed as clear and recovered," Wood's grand-daughter-in-law Kate Neidigh wrote, CBS reported. "If she continues on her current path, she could possibly be discharged to go home in approximately a week."

—In an undercover mission, Israel's spy agency Mossad has purchased COVID-19 testing kids from abroad and will deploy them across the nation for drive-through testing, the Wall Street Journal reported. The prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he hopes to carry out thousands of tests a day.

COVID-19 cases reach over 278,000 worldwide

— There are now 278,136 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 11,572 deaths and 89,276 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. There are 19,624 cases in the US, 260 deaths and 147 recoveries.

— Bandi Beach in Sydney, Australia was shut down on Saturday, after people gathered there in crowds the previous day despite social distancing recommendations, according to the New York Times. “I for one, as the police minister, cannot sit by,” David Elliott, the police and emergency services minister for the state of New South Wales said at a news conference. “The photos that we saw this morning were a clear breach of faith."

— Angola reported its first two coronavirus cases, both men in their 30s who traveled from Portugal, the country's health minister Silvia Lutucuta said during a news conference, according to CNN.

Death rates from COVID-19 continue to soar in Italy

— In Italy, 9,600 people were given citations for violating lockdowns, Italy's interior ministry said Friday. People are only allowed to leave for essentials— to grocery or medicine shop, doctors appointments and a walk once per day— but they have to fill out a form before they leave explaining why they're leaving, according to the Washington Post. The country reported 627 deaths today, bringing the total to over 4,000.

— The U.S. now has over 18,500 confirmed cases, 227 deaths and 147 recoveries from COVID-19.

— Despite the announcement a couple of days ago that national parks would remain open, Yosemite National Park in California is now closed, according to a statement.

Illinois orders people to "stay at home"

More than one in five Americans will soon be under orders to stay indoors, according to the New York Times. Illinois just ordered its residents to "stay at home," except to go to the grocery stores or pharmacies, put gas in their cars or take walks outside, starting on Saturday, according to the Chicago Tribune. Yesterday, California announced a similar "stay at home" order and earlier today, New York ordered non-essential businesses to close.

— Zimbabwe reported its first case of coronavirus, a 38-year-old man, Obadiah Moyo, Zimbabwe's minister of health said Friday on state television ZTV, according to the Sunday Times.

— The Florida Keys is closing to visitors starting on Sunday, March 22, according to a statement. "The only exception is for long-term renters in vacation homes and R/V parks with contracts of 28 days or more, who are presently in the Keys," they wrote. "They are to be allowed to remain until the conclusion of their contracts."

U.S. announces border closures, WHO distributes 1.5 million coronavirus tests

—Borders between the U.S and Mexico and the U.S. and Canada will close to nonessential travel on Saturday at midnight, the administration announced during a White House briefing on Friday.

— All restaurants, bars, cafes and gyms in the UK are ordered to close Friday evening, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced.

— The World Health Organization (WHO) distributed 1.5 million coronavirus tests around the world, Dr. Mike Ryan, executive director of the WHO health emergencies program said at a briefing on Friday. But that's not enough: the world will need at least 80 times the amount of tests, he added.

New York orders all "non-essential" businesses to close

— Today, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said all non-essential businesses must close in the state and people should stay indoors except to go outside for "solitary" exercise. Cases in the state are nearing 6,000, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

— Trends in Italy suggest that males are more likely to die than females in every age group, Deborah Birx, a physician and public health expert said on Friday.

— Tax day, or the day by which people need to file their income tax returns, was postponed to July 15, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday. 

COVID-19 deaths pass 10,000 worldwide

— There are 246, 275 confirmed cases, 10,038 deaths and 86,035 recoveries from the coronavirus worldwide. There are 14,250 confirmed cases in the U.S., 205 deaths and 121 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— California’s governor, Gavin Newsom, ordered everyone in the state to stay at home except for essentials (such as food, prescriptions or essential jobs) starting at midnight on Thursday. 

— A man in the UK has been arrested for not self-isolating himself on the island even though everyone was told to self-isolate for 14 days upon arriving, with or without symptoms, according to The Guardian

Senate Republicans introduce an economic relief bill

— Senate Republicans introduced an economic relief bill that would provide $1,200 to Americans making up to $75,000 a year, along with an extra $500 per child, according to The Washington Post. The bill, known as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, would also provide loans to small businesses as well as tax cuts to larger corporations.

— U.S. airlines could see a "virtual shutdown" as demand plummets due to international travel bans and recommendations to stay home amidst the coronavirus outbreak, according to CNN. American and Delta have already grounded half their fleets and cancelled thousands of flights. So far, restrictions have not been placed on domestic travel, but they are under consideration.

— The United States now has more than 13,000 reported cases of COVID-19, and 176 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— English football games have been suspended until April 30 at the earliest, according to the BBC.

US cases soar and US airlines may see 'virtual shutdown'

— Senate Republicans introduced an economic relief bill that would provide $1,200 to Americans making up to $75,000 a year, along with an extra $500 per child, according to The Washington Post. The bill, known as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, would also provide loans to small businesses as well as tax cuts to larger corporations.

— U.S. airlines could see a "virtual shutdown" as demand plummets due to international travel bans and recommendations to stay home amidst the coronavirus outbreak, according to CNN. American and Delta have already grounded half their fleets and cancelled thousands of flights. So far, restrictions have not been placed on domestic travel, but they are under consideration.

— The United States now has more than 13,000 reported cases of COVID-19, and 176 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— English football games have been suspended until April 30 at the earliest, according to the BBC.

State department issues level 4 travel recommendation

— American citizens should not travel abroad and those abroad should return home if commercial departure options are available or remain abroad for an "indefinite period", according to new recommendations from the State Department. They issued a level 4 travel recommendation.

— Connecticut postponed its presidential primary originally scheduled for April 28 to June 2, according to a Tweet from the Connecticut governor Ned Lamont.

— The National Park Service is waiving entrance fees into national parks, according to a statement. "This small step makes it a little easier for the American public to enjoy the outdoors in our incredible National Parks,” said Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt.

Bayer donates 3 million tablets of chloroquine phosphate to the U.S. to help fight coronavirus

Italy's COVID-19 death rate hits 3,405, surpassing China and becoming the highest death rate in the world, according to the New York Times.

— TJX Companies, the parent company of TJMaxx and Marshalls, is temporarily shutting down stores worldwide to help stop the spread of the virus, they announced on Thursday.

— Bayer donated 3 million tablets of an antimalarial drug, chloroquine phosphate, sold under the name Resochin, to the U.S., according to a statement. Resochin was developed to treat and prevent malaria but "appears to have broad spectrum antiviral properties and effects on the body’s immune response," they wrote. Some limited data from China indicates that Reoschin could help in treating patients with COVID-19, they wrote.

— At a news briefing on Thursday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo ordered businesses to keep 75 percent of their workers at home. Yesterday, he had ordered businesses to keep 50 percent at home. 

There are now over 10,700 COVID-19 cases in US

— A large backlog of pending COVID-19 tests in the U.S. will be released in the next few days,  Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said in a news conference, according to The New York Times.

— There are now more than 10,700 COVID-19 cases in the United States, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— President Trump said in a news conference that he had cut bureaucratic barriers so that effective treatments for COVID-19 could be developed as fast as possible. FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said the President had directed the agency to take a closer look at  whether hydroxychloroquine, a treatment for malaria, might benefit patients with COVID-19, according to CNN.

China reports no new local cases of COVID-19

— There are now 222,643 cases, 9,115 deaths and 84,506 recoveries of COVID-19 worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard.

— In the U.S., there are over 9,400 cases of COVID-19, 150 deaths and 106 recoveries, according to the dashboard.

— On Thursday, China reported zero new local infections for the previous day, according to the New York Times. But to call the outbreak over, they will need to see at least 14 consecutive days of no new infections, experts said.

— Lufthansa grounded 700 of its 763 planes, according to CNN.

— The Union Square Hospitality Group (USHG) cut down its workforce by 80% — laying off 2,000 people— after they have been facing a "near complete elimination of revenue," a spokesman told Eater New York. The founder of USHG, Danny Meyer announced on Twitter he was contributing his entire compensation and his executive team was taking a pay cut to donate to a relief fund they set up for USHG employees.

Pentagon says naval ship with hospital beds won't be ready for weeks

— A naval ship with 1,000 hospital beds was reportedly heading to New York Harbor in light of the growing number of coronavirus cases in the state. But the Pentagon said Wednesday that it won’t be ready for a couple of weeks, according to CNBC.

— Italian volunteers 3D printed unofficial valves, which were in short supply at Italian hospitals, to help with coronavirus treatments, according to The Verge.

— Florida representative Mario Diaz-Balart tested positive for the coronavirus, according to The New York Times.

— Among the 508 patients known to be hospitalized in the US so far, 20% were aged 20 to 44, 18% were aged 45 to 54 and 5% were aged 0 to 19, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the fatality rate was higher among older patients.

U.S. Senate passes measure to provide paid sick leave, unemployment benefits, coronavirus testing

— The U.S. Senate has passed a measure to provide paid sick leave, unemployment benefits and free coronavirus testing as well as food and health aid to people affected by the pandemic, according to The New York Times. The bill will now be sent to President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it.

— All U.S. national parks that are still open amid the coronavirus outbreak will waive entrance fees to help people practice social distancing outdoors, according to CNN.

— A small Italian town appears to have drastically reduced coronavirus infections —  reaching zero cases last week  — after implementing an aggressive tactic to curb spread. 

— Half a million nasal swabs were transported from Italy to the U.S., Pentagon officials announced, according to the Washington Post. The swabs are needed for coronavirus testing, and have been in short supply. The swabs arrived in Memphis and will be sent to various locations around the U.S.

Italy reports highest daily death toll increase

— Italy reported 475 new COVID-19-related deaths on Wednesday. This is the highest daily COVID-19 death toll increase recorded worldwide, according to The Washington Post.

— Schools in the UK will be shut down starting on Friday until further notice, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Wednesday. There are currently 2,626 confirmed cases in the UK and 104 deaths, according to the BBC.

— University of Oxford scientists developed a test for the new coronavirus which they claim can deliver results in 30 minutes, according to a press release

— London could follow other European cities and be locked down in an attempt to slow the coronavirus spread, according to CNN.

A naval ship with hospital beds headed to NY Harbor

— The White House is proposing an emergency stimulus package that would send two rounds of $1,000 directly to Americans, and would allocate $300 billion for helping small businesses, according to The Washington Post

— President Donald Trump announced he is invoking an law passed in 1950 to increase production of critical medical supplies to fight the coronavirus, according to NBC News. The law, known as the Defense Production Act, allows the president to require U.S. businesses to make materials for national defense, which in this case, could be ventilators or protective equipment for health care workers, such as face masks.

— A naval ship with 1,000 hospital beds is headed to New York Harbor in light of the growing number of coronavirus cases in the state, according to The New York Times. The nearly 900-foot ship, called the USNS Comfort, has previously deployed to areas hit by natural disasters, including Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria in 2017, the Times reported.

First dog to test weakly positive for coronavirus has died

— The Eurovision Song Contest is canceled for the first time in 64 years, according to a statement. It was originally set to take place in May in the Netherlands.

— Canada and the U.S. will be closing the border between them to non-essential traffic, according to a tweet from Donald Trump.

— The first dog that had been tested "weak positive" for the coronavirus in Hong Kong died on Monday (March 16) after returning home from quarantine, according to the South China Morning Post. The owner of the 17-year-old Pomeranian didn't allow an autopsy, so it's not clear why the dog died.

Coronavirus cases surpass 200,000 worldwide

— Coronavirus cases have surpassed 200,000 and deaths have surpassed 8,000 worldwide. There are over 82,000 who have recovered so far, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard

— The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is planning to brief national committees on Wednesday about the summer olympics set to take pace in Tokyo from July 24 and August 9. The IOC has so far remained adamant about continuing on with the Tokyo 2020 Olympics amid the outbreak, according to Reuters.

— Uncontrolled spread of the new coronavirus could overwhelm hospitals, cause up to 510,000 deaths in Britain and 2.2 million deaths in the U.S., according to a new report from the Imperial College in London. Both the U.S. and the UK have strengthened measures to stop the spread of the virus, supposedly based on the conclusions of the report, according to the New York Times.

— The MS Braemar, a transatlantic cruise ship carrying at least five passengers with COVID-19, has docked at the Cuban port of Mariel. The ship spent days looking for a port that would allow them to dock and was refused entry at many Caribbean ports, according to CNN.

COVID-19 cases surpassed 100

— Turkey announced its first coronavirus death, according to a news conference on Tuesday. The country has a total of 98 cases so far.

— COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. surpassed 100 on Tuesday. There are a total of 6,420 cases in the U.S. 

— The Trump administration is planning to turn back asylum seekers and foreigners trying to enter the U.S. from Mexico illegally out of coronavirus concerns, according to the New York Times.

— “While we are confident that stores will remain open and supply will continue to meet demand nationwide, we ask all Americans to only purchase enough food and essentials for the week ahead," Dr. Stephen Hahn, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner said in a statement today.

— The coronavirus has now spread to all 50 states and D.C. West Virginia, the last state to report infections, confirmed its first case on Tuesday, according to the Washington Post.

LA faces a blood shortage, EU bans non-essential travel

— Cases of COVID-19 that go undetected or diagnosed may have fueled the rapid spread of the disease, according to a new study reported on by Live Science.

— The European Union banned non-essential travel to at least 26 of its countries from the rest of the world, according to the New York Times. Britain won't be participating in the ban, said Ursula von der Leyen, the president of the European Commission.

— The Los Angeles area is facing a blood shortage after 160 major blood drives were canceled in the last couple of weeks, according to CNN.

New Yorker's should prepare for a possible "shelter-in-place"

— New Yorker's should be prepared for a possible "shelter-in-place" decision within the next 48 hours, Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a press conference on Tuesday.

— Macy's will temporarily close down all their stores starting on Tuesday until the end of the month in an effort to combat the spread of the coronavirus, the company wrote in a statement.

— The effects of social distancing won't been seen for at least one week, Caitlin Rivers, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said during a webcast Tuesday.

White House supports sending checks to Americans to help with outbreak

— The White House said Tuesday (March 17) that it supports the idea of making immediate cash payments to Americans to help out during this coronavirus outbreak. “We’re looking at sending checks to Americans immediately,” Steve Mnuchin, the Treasury Secretary said at a news briefing. “And I mean, now in the next two weeks.” 

— It's possible that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. could peak in 45 days, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease  said at a news conference today. New York's governor Andrew Cuomo had said earlier today that he expects the peak in the state to be around 45 days.

— An Italian citizen Olmo Parenti and his friends created a film called "10 days" with a message "from the future" to take COVID-19 seriously  [Watch it on The Atlantic

Trump administration will ask for $850 billion to help economy

— The Trump administration will ask senators for an $850 billion to help the economy on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. They are also considering a request for $50 billion to help the airline industry. 

— New York is "absolutely considering" a shelter-in-place, similar to the order in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said, according to the Washington Post.

— Iran has temporarily released 85,000 prisoners, including political prisoners, to stop the coronavirus from spreading in the overcrowded jails, according to Reuters.

Cases reach over 185,000 worldwide

— There are over 185,000 positive COVID-19 cases, 7,330 deaths and 80,236 recoveries worldwide; The US has over 4,660 cases, 85 deaths and 17 recoveries, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

— Amid the coronavirus outbreak, some states have postponed their primaries, but Florida, Illinois and Arizona have not. Their primaries are set to take place today (March 17).

— New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy encouraged residents to stay home between 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. unless for emergencies and essentials. Officials are considering a similar curfew for New York City, according to the New York Times.

— The Kentucky Derby is postponed for the first time in 75 years, according to the Louisville's Courier-Journal.

— On March 16, China only had one local infection of the coronavirus in Wuhan, where the epidemic started, according to China's National Health and Health Commission. The rest of the cases of COVID-19 reported that day were from travelers coming back into the country.

First person in the U.S. receives experimental coronavirus vaccine

— Georgia Governor Brian Kemp ordered all public schools to shut down from Wednesday until March 31. [Get more Georgia coronavirus updates here]

— Today, a healthy volunteer in Seattle became the first person to receive an experimental coronavirus vaccine as part of a new clinical trial, but it will still be a while before it's ready for the public to use, according to a Live Science report

— NASCAR is postponing all of its races until May 3, according to a statement

Stocks experience worst drop since beginning of coronavirus outbreak

— Stocks have experienced the worst drop since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak, according to the New York Times.

— D.C. ordered all restaurants, bars and clubs to close by 10 p.m. on Monday until April 1, Mayor Muriel Bowser said in a news conference today. Take-out and delivery will still be allowed.

— The College Board canceled the May 2 SAT tests and makeup exams scheduled for March 28, according to a statement. Students will receive refunds. 

— Switzerland declared an "extraordinary situation" and prohibited all public and private events as of midnight tonight until April 19th, according to a statement from the Swiss Federal Council. They ordered the closing of all shops, restaurants, bars and entertainment and leisure facilities. 

Trump announces new coronavirus guidelines

— President Trump issued new guidelines to help curb the coronavirus outbreak for the next 15 days. The guidelines include avoiding gathering in groups of over 10 people; avoiding bars, restaurants, food courts; avoiding discretionary travel; and working from home and engaging in virtual schooling whenever possible. "If you are an older person, stay home and away from other people," the guidelines read. [Read the full set of guidelines on CNN]

— The coronavirus crisis could continue until July or August, Trump said in a news conference on Monday. But he said he's not currently considering a nation-wide lockdown like those in other countries such as Italy.

— Six counties in California's Bay Area is expected to announce a "shelter in place" order for residents until at least April 7. Residents will be told to stay home as much as possible but they will still be able to go shopping for food and household supplies, seek medical care and go outside for walks or exercise if they stay six feet away from everyone they don't live with, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. (The counties are: San Francisco, Santa Clara, San Mateo, Marin, Contra Costa and Alameda). 

— France will close its borders starting Tuesday (March 17) to help curb the spread of the coronavirus and Russia will close its borders to most foreigners starting on Wednesday, according to CNN.

WHO says countries need to undertake more vigorous testing, isolation

— The European Union is considering a temporary travel restriction to member countries to help stop the spread of the coronavirus, Ursula von der Leye, president of the European Commission said on Monday. This would restrict all "non-essential" travel to the EU to everyone except for returning E.U. citizens, health care workers, doctors and nurses. 

— The Supreme Court is postponing arguments scheduled for March because of health concerns over the coronavirus, according to a statement. One argument that was postponed is about access to President Trump's financial records, according to CNBC.

— "You cannot fight a fire blindfolded, and we cannot stop this pandemic if we don’t know who is infected," said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director general of the World Health Organization said during a news conference on Monday (March 16). "We have a simple message for all countries: test, test test... test every suspected case." He also said countries aren't doing enough to escalate testing, isolation and contact tracing which is "the backbone of the response."

— During a conference call with a group of governors Monday, he told them to not wait for the federal government to supply them with more respirators and equipment, according to the New York Times. "Respirators, ventilators, all of the equipment — try getting it yourselves," Trump said. "We will be backing you, but try getting it yourselves."

— Canada, which has 375 positive COVID-19 cases, is closing its borders to non-citizens, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Monday. 

New York, New Jersey and Connecticut coordinate COVID-19 response

— Gatherings of over 50 people are banned and all casinos, gyms and movie theaters in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut will close as of 8 p.m. on Monday (March 16), according to a joint announcement from the states. 

— Reinfection with the new coronavirus couldn't occur in rhesus macaques, according to a study published in the preprint journal bioRxiv on March 14. "Our results indicated that the primary SARS-CoV-2 infection could protect from subsequent exposures," the authors wrote in the study, which hasn't yet been peer-reviewed.  

— A cyberattack on the Department of Health and Human Services was an attempt to slow down coronavirus response, according to ABC News. It is still under investigation.

— Penguins were allowed to leave their habitats and explore the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago which is closed to visitors, according to the Chicago Tribune. “Without guests in the building, caretakers are getting creative in how they provide enrichment to animals,” the aquarium said, “introducing new experiences, activities, foods and more to keep them active, encourage them to explore, problem-solve and express natural behaviors.”

— In the absence of boats, Venice canals have turned clear again and fish have made a reappearance, according to local newspaper La Nuova di Venezia e Mestre.

— New York City's public schools are closed and will likely reopen for remote learning on March 23, Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Sunday.

— Nara Park in Japan is a popular tourist destination and home to free-roaming deer that are typically fed with ample amounts of rice crackers. But amid the coronavirus outbreak, tourism has dwindled and some of the deer have wandered out of the park into other parts of the city in search for food, according to Japan Today.

Monkeys fight for food, US stocks plunge

— Egypt is suspending all flights for two weeks starting on Thursday, Egypt's prime minister Moustafa Madbouly announced at a press conference, according to local media reports.

— U.S. stocks plunged again Monday morning creating a 15-minute halt to trading, and then dropped even further, according to the Los Angeles Times.

— More people have died from the coronavirus outside of mainland China than inside, according to the Washington Post

— Tourism in Thailand has plummeted because of the new coronavirus. Starving monkeys who are usually fed free food from the tourists are fighting each other on the streets, according to a Live Science report.

US COVID-19 cases reach 3,774

— There are now 169,387 confirmed cases of COVID-19; 6,513 deaths and 77,257 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard. There are 3,774 positive cases in the U.S. and 69 deaths.

— New York City will close down all of its bars and restaurants, save for takeout and delivery service starting on Tuesday (March 17), Mayor Bill de Blasio said Sunday night.

— An Irish budget airline, Ryanair, said it expected to ground most of its planes in Europe in the next week to 10 days, according to a statement

— LVMH, a French luxury goods company will use its perfume and cosmetics production lines to create hand disinfectant gel and deliver them for free to health authorities in France, according to the BBC.

CDC recommends cancelling, postponing events with over 50 people

— All bars and restaurants in Massachusetts will shut down "on-premise consumption" starting on Tuesday until April 6, Governor Charlie Baker announced Sunday. All gatherings of larger than 25 people are also prohibited, according to the order.

— The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending that for the next 8 weeks, organizers cancel or postpone events with over 50 people, according to guidance posted on their site on Sunday.

— The Tennessee man who bought 17,700 bottles of hand sanitizer and was under investigation for price gouging, donated all of it to people in Tennessee after outrage from the public, according to the New York Times

— The first dose of a vaccine for COVID-19 will be given to a person on Monday, kickstarting a clinical trial, according to a government official, as reported by AP News

Cities across the US take measures to slow the spread of the coronavirus

— Labs across the US will be able to screen up to 4,000 people a day starting this week, the administration announced Sunday (March 15).

— New York City's public schools will start to shut down this week, New York's Governor Andrew Cuomo said Sunday.

— California will close down all bars, night clubs, wineries and brew pubs, California's governor Gavin Newsom said Sunday.

— New York City's hospitals will be required to cancel elective surgeries starting on Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said. 

— Starbucks stores in the US and Canada will become a "to go" model for two weeks meaning customers can still order but won't be able to sit down at the stores, according to a statement.

— Boston declared a public health emergency and required bars, restaurants and nightclubs to reduce their capacity by half and close by 11 p.m., Mayor Marty Walsh announced Sunday. Food drive through and delivery services can continue normal business hours, according to a statement.

Italy reports 368 deaths in a single day

— Italy had 368 coronavirus-related deaths in the last 24 hours, Civil Protection Department Chief Angelo Borrelli announced at a press conference today. That brings Italy's total coronavirus death toll to 1,809. The country has a total of 24,747 positive cases of COVID-19, with 3,590 of those cases recorded in the past day.

— Colombia is blocking all non-residents from entering the country and requiring residents to self-isolate for 14 days, President Ivan Duque said on Twitter.

— Germany is introducing border controls with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg and Switzerland to slow the spread of the virus, Interior Minister Horst Seehofer said during a news conference on Sunday (March 15).

— There are now 3,244 positive cases of COVID-19 in the US and 62 deaths.

Cruise ship with COVID-19 cases looks for place to dock

— New York Governor Andrew Cuomo asked the president to mobilize the military to help in the fight against the coronavirus, in an opinion piece published in the New York Times.

— A cruise ship, MS Braemar, with over 600 passengers and at least five confirmed coronavirus cases is trying to find somewhere to dock after being denied entry at various ports in the Caribbean, according to CNN.

— Nike is shutting down all of its stores in the U.S., Canada, New Zeand, Western Europe and Australia until March 27, according to a statement.

— Hoboken in New Jersey is the first city in the U.S. that's implementing a curfew to fight the coronavirus, according to Insider. Residents of Hoboken must stay inside save for emergencies or if they're required to work during the night, according to Mayor Ravinder Bhalla.

2 ER doctors in critical condition with COVID-19

Two ER doctors — a man in his 40s in Washington and a 70-year-old in New Jersey — are in critical condition after being infected with the novel coronavirus and developing COVID-19. 

“I am deeply saddened by this news, but not surprised. As emergency physicians, we know the risks of our calling. We stand united with our colleagues and our thoughts and prayers for a full and speedy recovery are with each of them and their families,” Dr. William Jaquis, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), said in a statement.

It is uncertain how the Washington doctor caught the virus, whether at work or through other community-based spread, the ACEP statement said. The doctor had complied with all personal protective equipment (PPE) procedures. 

As for the New Jersey physician, that doctor leads his institution’s emergency preparedness in Patterson, and was admitted to the hospital days ago with upper respiratory issues. That person, who has tested positive for COVID-19, is in isolation in the facility’s intensive care unit.

Newborn tests positive for coronavirus

— There are now 156,400 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 5,833 deaths and 73,968 recovered from COVID-19 worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard; There are 2,952 cases in the U.S. and 57 deaths.

— A newborn baby tested positive for the coronavirus in London, marking what's likely the youngest case of the disease, according to The Guardian. The baby's mother was tested positive for COVID-19 when she was taken to a hospital with suspected pneumonia days before giving birth.

— The Vatican is closing Holy Week celebrations to the public, according to the New York Times

— The UK advised against "all but essential travel to the USA," in response to the travel restrictions that the U.S. put in place for the UK and other European countries, according to a post from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on its website. 

Trump tests negative, Italy cases continue rising

— President Trump tested negative for the coronavirus, according to a statement from the White House. 

— Georgia delayed its presidential primary, becoming the second state to do so. The primary that was originally set to take place on March 24 will now take place on May 19, according to a statement.

— Coronavirus cases in Italy rose by around 20% on Saturday, the largest daily increase in cases yet, according to the Washington Post

Spain announces nation-wide lockdowns

— Spain, experiencing the second-worst coronavirus outbreak in Europe, announced nation-wide lockdowns on Saturday. Spain's prime Minister Pedro Sánchez announced today that the public must stay home unless they need to do something essential such as buy food, go to work, care for those in need or get healthcare themselves. There are 6,315 confirmed cases and 191 coronavirus-related deaths in Spain as of Saturday afternoon. 

— Louisiana reported its first coronavirus-related death, a 58-year-old Orleans Parish resident who had underlying health conditions, according to a statement from the Louisiana Department of Health.

—"I feel fine, things are going well, just taking the proper precautions," Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell, who was confirmed to have COVID-19 this week, said in a video posted on Twitter. He is currently under isolation.

France shuts down restaurants, clubs

— France is shutting down restaurants, cafes, cinemas and clubs starting at midnight Saturday, French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe said on Saturday (March 14). Markets, food shops, pharmacies, gas stations, banks, newspaper and tobacco stores and places of worship will remain open, he said. But religious ceremonies and gatherings will be postponed.

— Trump is considering some travel restrictions within the country, according to CNN.

— An 82-year-old woman with COVID-19 died in New York City this weekend, NYC's first coronavirus-related death, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said during a media conference Saturday.

U.S. extends travel bans to Ireland and UK

— US is expanding travel bans to the UK and Ireland starting on Monday at midnight, Vice President Mike Pence announced today (March 14). Originally, his travel bans had just extended to the rest of Europe.

— President Trump took a coronavirus test but doesn’t know the results yet, he announced at a press conference today. A Brazilian official and several others who were with Trump last weekend, tested positive for the coronavirus. Trump had originally said he "isn't concerned” and likely won’t be tested.

House passes relief package, Apple closing stores

— The pentagon will close for visitors (not people who work in the Defense Department buildings) at midnight on Sunday, according to a statement from the Defense Department. They are also stopping all domestic travel for military service members, department of defense civilians and their families in the U.S. for two months starting on Monday, according to another statement

— The House overwhelmingly passed a coronavirus economic relief package which dedicates tens of billions of dollars to help people affected by the coronavirus. This package would help pay sick leave, unemployment insurance, free testing and other measures, according to the Washington Post.

— The coronavirus has now spread to 49 states. There are a total of 146,838 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 5,539 deaths and 71,718 recoveries worldwide, according to the Johns Hopkins Dashboard.

— Apple is closing down its stores outside of China until March 27, according to a statement

— Guatemala is expanding its travel restrictions by banning arrivals (subjecting them to quarantine) from the U.S. and Canada, President Alejandro Giammattei said on Friday.  Earlier this week, the country had banned arrivals from European countries, China, Iran, South Korea and North Korea in an effort to fight the coronavirus.

Europe is the new epicenter, WHO says

— The Food and Drug Administration approved a new coronavirus test from the pharmaceutical company Roche that could be a breakthrough for testing, according to NPR. The new test is simpler and quicker than the initial test approved by the FDA, Paul Brown, a senior executive for Roche said.  

— An employee who works at the Monroe Correctional Complex, a Washington State prison tested positive for the coronavirus, which might be the first case tied to a prison, according to the New York Times

— Europe is now the epicenter of the pandemic, the World Health Organization Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during a media briefing today. New COVID-19 cases in China are declining, while cases in other parts of the world are increasing.

— There are now over 145,000 cases of COVID-19 worldwide and 5,411 deaths. There are over 70,200 people who have already recovered, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard

— Stocks rebounded on Friday after President Trump declared a national emergency that would "open up access" to federal funds. 

Trump declares national emergency

— Trump  declared a national emergency on Friday during a press conference at the White House. This declaration will open up access to federal funds — some $50 billion — to fight COVID-19, he said.

— Denmark is closing its borders to non-citizens on Saturday until April 13, the government announced today. 

— Texas governor Greg Abbott declared the new coronavirus a public health disaster and announced the opening of the state's first drive-through testing facility in San Antonio, at a press conference on Friday

Louisiana postpones primary

— Louisiana postponed its presidential primary which would have taken place on April 4, Louisiana Secretary of State Kyle Ardoin announced today. Louisiana, the first state to postpone a primary, will now hold it on June 20.  

— President Trump plans to declare a national emergency today, according to the Washington Post. That means he'd have more authority to use $40 billion disaster-relief funds, according to the New York Times.

— Miami Mayor, Francis Suarez, tested positive for the coronavirus after attending an event in Florida with a Brazilian government aide who later tested positive for the virus, according to the Miami Herald.  

Boston marathon postponed, U.S. takes steps to speed up testing

— Coronavirus cases reach 137,456 worldwide, with 5,065 total deaths and 69,623 recoveries. There are 1,268 total cases in the U.S., 15,113 in Italy, 11,364 in Iran and 7,869 in South Korea, according to the Johns Hopkins dashboard

— The Boston marathon will be postponed until September, Boston's Mayor Marty Walsh said Friday (March 13).

— Major golf events, including the Masters Tournament, the Augusta National Women's Amateur and the Drive, Chip and Putt National Finals have been postponed, according to a statement

— The Trump administration announced that they will take steps to speed up screening and testing of COVID-19 in the U.S. which has been lagging far behind other countries, according to the New York Times. These steps include introducing an emergency hotline for private labs, forming new partnerships with companies that can quickly detect the virus and awarding over a million dollars to two companies, DiaSorin Molecular and Qiagen to hasten the development of tests.

— Stocks rebounded on Friday after having experienced the worst day since 1987 yesterday, according to the Washington Post. 

South Korea cases down, Ethiopia reports first case

— Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, Canada's prime minister Justin Trudeau's wife, has tested positive for the virus after returning from a speaking event in the UK, according to the prime minister's tweets

— South Korea has reported more recoveries than coronavirus cases for the first time, according to Reuters. On Friday, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 110 new coronavirus cases and 177 patients who recovered.

— Peter Dutton, the Australian minister for home affairs tested positive for the virus on Friday after having met with Attorney General William Barr and Ivanka Trump the week before, according to the New York Times.

— Ethiopia confirmed its first case of the coronavirus, according to Reuters

— At least 6 states (Oregon, Ohio, Michigan, Maryland, Kentucky and New Mexico) will close all of their schools for at least two weeks, according to the New York Times

March Madness canceled, Ohio closes schools, events canceled

— A Brazilian official who met with President Trump last weekend has tested positive for the coronavirus, according to the Brazilian government. Trump said he "isn't concerned" and the White House later said through “exposures from the case are being assessed,” Trump and Vice President Mike Pence don't need testing, according to the New York Times

— Disneyland is closing its parks in California through the end of the month, according to a statement

— March Madness is canceled: The NCAA has canceled both men's and women's basketball tournaments.This announcement from the NCAA president follows on the news yesterday that the NCAA events would be closed to the public. The N.H.L and Major League Soccer announced they were pausing their seasons.

— New York is banning most gatherings that exceed 500 people including Broadway shows. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Carnegie Hall, the Metropolitan Opera and Lincoln Center are also all temporarily shutting down. Nearby Jersey City is imposing coronavirus curfews on bars and nightclubs.

— Trump said today (March 12) that restrictions for travel within the U.S. could occur if some regions become "too hot" with coronavirus, according to NBC News.

— Ohio is closing all of its K-12 schools, for an "extended spring break" until April 3, the state's governor Mike DeWine said today (March 12) during a news conference.

— There are currently 127,863 confirmed cases of the coronavirus worldwide and 4,718 deaths. In the U.S., there are 1,323 cases and 38 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins coronavirus dashboard

Parades, sports events canceled in the U.S.

— California Gov. Gavin Newsom called for all public gatherings to be canceled, saying, "Each of us has extraordinary power to slow the spread of this disease. Not holding that concert or community event can have cascading effects — saving dozens of lives and preserving critical health care resources that your family may need a month from now,” according to news reports.

— President Trump announced that he would be suspending travel from Europe (excluding the UK) for 30 days starting on Friday, a decision that was met with disapproval from the European Union, according to news reports.

—  The NBA canceled all basketball games after a player on the Utah Jazz tested preliminarily positive for coronavirus, according to an NBA statement. Games as of Thursday (March 12) will be suspended until further notice, the statement said.

—  March Madness, the biggest college basketball tournament of the year, going back to 1939, will be played with limited viewers. The championship events would happen “with only essential staff and limited family attendance,” The NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement on Wednesday (March 11). The first games take place on March 17-18.

— New York City postponed its St. Patrick's Day Parade next week over fears of the coronavirus, according to a statement from New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. This parade, the largest St. Patrick's Day parade in the world typically brings 150,000 marchers and 2 million spectators to the streets of Manhattan, according to the New York Times. This is the first time that the event will not go on as planned for 250 years, they wrote. Ireland canceled all it's St. Patrick's Day parades; Similar celebrations were canceled in Chicago and Boston.

— Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita Wilson have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a statement he tweeted out. They are currently in Australia where Hanks is filming for a movie.

— Wall Street has halted trading for a second time this week for 15 minutes in a pause known as a "circuit breaker," according to NBC News

— Missouri is suing disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker for promoting a fake treatment after he suggested on his TV program that colloidal silver will cure the new coronavirus, according to the Washington Post

The white house classifies coronavirus discussions

— The White House has classified dozens of high-level discussions regarding the coronavirus, allowing only some individuals high security clearances access to the information, CNBC reported.

— Italy’s Ministry of Health is reporting a total of 12,462 coronavirus cases with 827 deaths related to the virus.

— India is suspending all tourist visas; travelers or nationals returning to India from high-risk areas will be quarantined for at least 14 days, the government's Press Information Bureau said in a statement.

— Hundreds of Americans have already lost jobs over the past week due to the outbreak, according to the Washington Post.

WHO declares pandemic

—The World Health Organization has declared the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2, which causes the disease COVID-19, a pandemic."This is the first pandemic caused by coronavirus," said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, "This is the first pandemic caused by coronavirus," said WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

—Scientists figure out how the novel coronavirus breaks into human cells, a discovery that could help in the development of vaccines and other treatments. 

—King County, outside Seattle, Washington, confirmed that 10 nursing home or other long-term care facilities have individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19, the Seattle Times reported.

Confusion and chaos surround coronavirus testing in the U.S., with even doctors not clear on who should be tested.

Grand Princess cruise ship

After more than 20 people tested positive for COVID-19 aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship off California, the U.S. State Department issued an alert Sunday (March 8) strongly recommending the elderly and those with underlying health conditions to avoid cruise ships.

Cases in Italy, South Korea and Iran have surpassed 7,000 each, with the death toll in Italy reaching 366. The northwest part of the country is on lockdown, limiting mobility of some 16 million people in what is being called "one of the largest-ever attempts to restrict the movement of people in a Western democracy," The New York Times reported.

The U.S. has approved $8.3 billion in emergency funding for the country's coronavirus response.

The South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin, Texas, has been cancelled due to coronavirus concerns. The event, which was to take place March 13–22, typically attracts hundreds of thousands of people.  

A dog in China whose owner has a confirmed case of COVID-19 has tested 'weak positive' for the virus, experts confirmed. 

Originally published on Live Science.